A Personal Story on Public Education


My interest in economics began with my initial interest in politics. What got me started in politics, you ask? My older brother took me to see Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11 in theatres back when it first came out. Yeah, needless to say I didn’t exactly get a good start into the field. Later on, I began to follow the various political day-to-day news that was taking place; I took to watching The Ed Show, Keith Olbermann, and Rachael Maddow to soak up as much as I could (insert your own joke about me being severely damaged by all of this).

My political positions were incredibly Left-wing; Socialized Medicine, Global Warming, Corporate Profits, the 99% and the 1%, the whole 9 yards, except for one exception; education. Any one who knows my past knows that I went through pure hell in school, from being bullied by the other kids to being targeted by malicious higher-ups with intent to slander, demonize, and to ultimately destroy. It was (and still is) my opinion at that time that the entire public school system needs to be abolished. My reasons are best illustrated by a personal story.

The school I went to (Quitman County Middle School, or Q.C.M.S), is in an extremely poor area in the Mississippi Delta, and so all of the food served in the cafeteria was free, subsidized by the state. At lunch time, we would line up, get a tray, give the cashier our assigned number, and we would sit down and eat. Well, some days I just wouldn’t take a tray. Why? Because the food served on those days was garbage; if I had taken a tray, I would’ve just thrown it in the trash. This got me in trouble on more than one occasion, and when I finally explained to them that it makes absolutely no sense for me to take a tray since I was just going to throw it away anyway, they responded by informing me that it didn’t matter if I ate the food; in order to keep the free program going, the state required that a certain number of kids be participating in the program, i.e., taking trays and giving numbers.

I looked around and thought that the majority of these kids, including myself, could easily pay for lunches with the money that we blew on snacks everyday both in and out of school, but I never shared that thought with anyone. Sometimes I would be in the library and I would see a notice about a meeting that would be held in the library in the form of a Luncheon, and around that time, I would see very professional looking men/women entering the library. I would sometimes sneak in close to get a look at these people, but the most I would see is them exchanging formalities and smiling/laughing with each other. This is about the same time that the kids loved to “get crunk” in the hallways (those who attended school with me will remember this); everyday (especially Friday) during period change, the kids, jam-packed in this tiny hallway, would turn the hallway light off and the entire hall would erupt in a riot of jumping, hollering, and sometimes even fights. The teachers (the few who still cared) were absolutely powerless to stop it, as were the administrators (who really didn’t give a rat’s ass).

Eventually, this utter chaos in the halls fell out of style with the kids, but I never got that image of those administrators joking, laughing, exchanging pleasant formalities, as if they were doing this spectacular job, even though it was not only well known that the majority of the kids at this school (during my day at least) was so stupid that they had a hard time passing something as simple as the MCT, it was also well known that the local drug dealers were using the school playground as a “place of business”, so to speak. Barbara Akon, the person who was principal of the school during the majority of my years there, was the leader of this circus. And to make matters worst, not only did she “manage” that school into the ground to the point to where the State had to step in and take it over the proceeding year after I left, Barbara C. Akon saw fit to sue the Quitman County School District on the basis of discrimination! 

I remind you all that all of this, the fancy luncheons, the subsidized waste in the school food system, all came at a great expense to the tax payer. Today, from what I can gather, Q.C.M.S. appears to have cleaned up its act for the most part, but that experience, watching that group of Affirmative Action Rejects rape and pillage that school in order to stroke their own egotistical sense of self-worth was the single most traumatic experience of my life, bar-none, and it is what convinced me that the public school system is nothing more than a prison with the illusion of a warden; it is a system of corruption, theft, and deceit so vile that it corrupts and corrodes everything it touches, and it is a system that must be abolished entirely.

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Posted on August 16, 2013, in Economics, Education, Political Philosophy and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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