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Human Reasoning vs God Reasoning


This issue comes up a lot when you back a Christian into a corner (of course he’ll deny being backed into a corner). If shown the folly of the Bible, he will reply that you’re simply using human reasoning to rationalize away the message of the Almighty, and with this he simply appeals to authority, and his zealotry inflates in response to such… uninformed criticism.

This of course assumes (quite wrongly) that humans are actually capable of understanding God’s reasoning. A species that doesn’t even amount to a speck of dust in the universe is capable of understanding the mind of a being who’s presumably older than time itself and created all there is in the universe. Yeah… no, that isn’t happening any time soon. The reason is fairly simple; we weren’t meant to, at least for the time being. Any reasoning that God makes must, for humans to comprehend it in our current state of perception and consciousness, MUST be transmuted into human reasoning.

This, and for no other reason (assuming Christianity is completely true), is the reason that Christianity, contrary to the opinions of the Christians themselves, is the reason that Christianity, as well as the other religions of Judaism and Islam,  is Human Reasoning.  Humans, in their current state, are utterly incapable of understanding the nature of a being that is both omnipotent and omnipresent, is all wise and all knowing, etc., etc.. The reasoning of this Deity is thus utterly meaningless to us, all that matters is that a being far more powerful than us is telling us to do X, Y, and Z. This is of course assuming that the Bible, as the Christians would have us believe, is the pure, infallible word of God.

It can be assumed, safely, that a being such as this is not going to make mistakes, but unfortunately for God, if it is assumed that the Bible is the pure word of God, the Bible is loaded to the hilt with mistakes.  Nevermind the purely scientific errors the Bible makes, of which others within the respective fields have pointed out, the errors I’m going to lay waste to are economic and philosophical.

The Bible tells us, in Romans 13 1-7:

Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God.

 2 Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves.

 3 For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong. Do you want to be free from fear of the one in authority? Then do what is right and you will be commended.

 4 For the one in authority is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for rulers do not bear the sword for no reason. They are God’s servants, agents of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer.

5 Therefore, it is necessary to submit to the authorities, not only because of possible punishment but also as a matter of conscience.

6 This is also why you pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, who give their full time to governing.

7 Give to everyone what you owe them: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor.

And just like that, the claim of infallibility goes up in smoke.  An unbiased look at history shows us, undeniably, that government authority figures are anything but bastions of the public good. Barbaric tribes throughout history who rape, pillage, and murder the surrounding territories for their personal enjoyment and gain have not, and could not have caused 1/6th of the horror that government authorities have implemented on people, especially their own, and it is not this way without reason.

The taxes it collects, which is justified supposedly by the Social Contract, are a guaranteed source of revenue. The money that the government collects through taxation is used to hire soldiers, who are then used to extract more money. The Social Contract, which he will insist is the justification for taxation, is illegitimate by its very nature. No court of law would ever accept as evidence for a claim of suit a contract that has not been signed by anyone. On the contrary, the Social Contract is nothing more than a decree of superiority of one group over another:

“We WILL provide you with whatever service we so desire to provide, whether you want it or not, you WILL pay us taxes for these services, whether you want to you or not, or you WILL be arrested, your property forcibly seized, or if it has to be done, we WILL kill you and those who resist with you.”

This is the Social Contract, and if you’re sane enough to reject such an arrangement, then you’re told to move to an island and away from society. Society is nothing more than a code-word for that network of interrelations by which people exchange their services voluntarily with one another. Since no one has ever signed an open, formal contract saying that they will pay taxes for services X, Y, and Z, taxation is theft. To forcibly confiscate a person’s money and then to infer or assume his content because he then proceeds to use those goods and services is an insufficient proof of consent. On the contrary, it is no proof of consent at all.

Is God so evil as to impose a system like this upon us? I don’t think so.  No, the above verses were written by some court historian who sought favor with the prevailing government of the time, or it was written by some poor fool who’s foundation in logic and reason has been all but washed away by systematic indoctrination.

Political Inconsistency/Cultish Behavior


You know, for some people economics is this mathematical science that allows people to predict the state of the future economy. For others, economics is the “dismal science”, i.e., a pseudo-scientific philosophy which rarely (if ever) tells us anything about the real world or makes accurate predictions. For myself, I can fully understand the latter group’s frustration with economics. How many economists told us, for instance, back in 2005-2007 that the economy was doing great, it was going to go even higher, etc.. And bear in mind that all of these economists had very sophisticated equations and models to back their arguments.

To me, economics isn’t a series of math equations or econometric models that predict the future. To me, the science of Economics is observation; it is acknowledging that humans act, i.e., utilize means to achieve pre-determined ends, and deducing from this the most logical conclusions that the actions themselves imply. Once you take and apply this method, you will understand precisely why the empirical/mathematical methodology utterly fails its purpose within the science of economics, but we will save the finer points of that conclusion for later. For right now, however, it is necessary that we take a few cases of complete hypocrisy regarding certain political issues that, at first glance, have nothing to do with each other. We will deal with two issues at the end in which the connection will be painfully obvious.

Rent Control/Minimum Wage:

These two issues, to the untrained eye, have next to nothing in common. Rent control is an act by which the amount of rent that can be charged by a landlord is capped, while Minimum Wage is an act by which employers are forced to pay their employees no lower than a given amount. Proponents of the Minimum Wage will argue fiercely that we need Minimum Wage regulations in order to enforce a “Livable Wage”, to keep the big guys from exploiting the little guys as “Slave Labor.”

Rent Control, however, has little to no supporters. Hardly anyone supports the idea of Rent Control. In fact, in 2011 when Jimmy McMillan, the RENT IS TOO DAMN HIGH guy, got evicted from his rent-controlled apartment, The Young Turks ran a segment on it. Cenk Uygur, who everyone knows is my FAVORITE news personality *sarcasm*, had this to say regarding Rent Control.

Quote from Cenk Uygur: “Now, it’s interesting because I actually think that Rent Control is not the right policy, and I think it’s created a lot of weird consequences because of it in New York; people holding onto apartments forever and doing all these shenanigans to pass it to people they know, yada yada yada.

 Of course, Cenk’s analysis doesn’t even cover a fraction of the problems regarding Rent Control, but this has nothing to do with what Rent Control and Minimum Wage regulations have in common at their core (besides being regulations, of course). The truth is, they are both price controls. Rent Control is a downwards control on Rent, Minimum Wage is an upwards control on wages. Price controls, ultimately, have the same effect no matter where in the economy they’re applied, i.e., Demand exceeds Supply and you have shortages as a result. In the case of Rent Control, it destroys existing housing, in the case of Minimum Wage, you doom a portion of the labor force to be unemployed indefinitely. But notice, Cenk Uygur is a fervent supporter of the Minimum Wage, but he opposes Rent Control as not being the right policy even though they are both, at their core, the exact same principle applied in two different directions.

 

Immigration/New Technology:

Ok, now this one is a head-scratcher. How can immigration possibly have anything to do with New Technology? How can someone be a hypocrite by supporting one but not the other?

The answer is simpler than it first appears. One needs only to consider what the ultimate effects of Immigration and New Technology are to see what they have in common. Immigration is that process by which people from foreign lands migrate from their home country in order to set up residence in another country. The effect this has on National Labor is immediately seen; the native laborers must compete with the laborers from the foreign lands for employment, thus driving down wages. The Protectionist exclaims that this is horrible; immigration should be restricted in order to protect National Labor against foreign competition. Why? Because Foreign Labor is willing to work for less than Native Labor. This competition creates unemployment for the Native Laborers, which puts us, ultimately, in a state of dependency on Foreign Labor and Foreign Investment.

New Technology, or Labor-Saving Devices if you prefer, is almost universally embraced (with a few notable exceptions). This wasn’t always the case, however. It used to be that new technology was frowned on. It was seen as the rich finding a way to squeeze the poor by laying them off and keeping the excess profits all to himself. it used to be argued, for instance, that if a machine were invented that would do the work of two workers as opposed to one, the employer would fire one of the two employees (the other would run the machine), and as a result, his income would be absent from circulation and the economy as a whole would suffer for it. Like I said, however, hardly anyone holds this position anymore.

What Immigration and New Technology both have in common is the means by which they operate in the market, and their ultimate effects. New Technology must, initially, compete with existing labor for the right to be used in place of the existing labor. If the New Technology is proven to be effective at the purpose for which it was designed, it begins putting pre-existing labor out of work, and while New Technology does create unemployment in the short-term, in the long-term however we are all better off for it.

Immigration has the same immediate competitive effects. The cheaper Foreign Labor, if it is effective, will put Native Workers out of work. The short-term result in both Immigration and New Technology regarding competition is the same. Ah, but the protectionist would be quick to intervene, “Your proposition is incredibly misleading! Sure, I cannot deny everything you’ve said thus far regarding the effects of Immigration and New Technology as you’ve said it, but you’re forgetting that New Technology doesn’t increase the population by one per new worker! New Technology doesn’t create new burdens on the tax-payer for school/emergency room fees!” I’m sorry to break this to Mr. Protectionist, but New Technology does in fact increase the population, just not in the immediate.

Immigration gives you in the short-run, regarding population increases, that you would’ve had with the New Technology. As the means of production become more efficient, we get greater returns for our labor, most notably in agriculture. More food = more energy for people to make babies. More energy for people to make babies = increase in the population. New Technology and Immigration, therefore, have the exact same long-term effects. It is therefore utter hypocrisy to oppose one on the basis that it creates unemployment, but defend from the other just such a criticism when they both have, in the long-run, the exact same effects.

The War on Drugs/Gun Control:

This is the one I mentioned earlier who’s connection is glaringly obvious. The War on Drugs is considered by many (including myself) to be a colossal failure; a government boondoggle in which billions of dollars has been wasted by housing otherwise harmless people in government-funding prisons, and is responsible for the rise of violent cartels (most notably in Mexico). The case for criminalization runs from “it’s harmful for you and society” to “you can’t be trusted with it”.

Remind me, along what lines does Gun Control go again? Oh yeah… “It’s harmful for you and society” to “you can’t be trusted with it.” The War on Drugs fails for the precise reason that if enough people want an illegal product, there will be a Black Market for said product. Just as in drugs, so too in guns. The same economic principles are at play in both cases, but notice one is being picked in favor of the other, even though the long-term effect of both policies is exactly the same. Once again, it is sheer hypocrisy to favor one over the other.

Conclusion:

The reason these people are contradicting themselves to such an extent is precisely because of their methodology; namely, the mathematical/empirical/statistical/positivistic methodology. The core problem with this doctrine, in my opinion, is the fact that in its line of reasoning, there isn’t any room for any sort of absolute truths. You have a hypothesis, you test the hypothesis, if your hypothesis comes through, you provisionally accept it. But even if your hypothesis comes through, this line of reasoning forces you to remember; it’s just a hypothesis and it could be overturned by the next experiment. As a result of this emphasizing what is seen, what is unseen is completely neglected, and if you point this out, they simply blast you for being “un-scientific”.

This sort of behavior, and line of reasoning, cannot be classified as anything but Cultish.